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Outlining a CV in Composition & Rhetoric

Composition and rhetoric is a little bit of an intimidating field to write one’s CV into, because we study and have expertise on the rhetoricity of things. Applying those same guidelines and standards to my own work can be intimidating. Nevertheless, here’s a beginning outline.

  1. Personal Information
    1. Include meaningful contact information: where I live is useful, but email and mobile phone are probably most meaningful.
    2. Include social media links (but be sure those included and those not included are up to snuff and entirely presentable). The identity we allow others to see who are not our friends is as important to readers of the CV as the identity we create for those who follow or like our social media presences.
    3. Include professional-oriented social media like LinkedIn and Academia.edu. One’s openness and willingness to be identified on social media is part of the rhetorical identity portrayed through the CV.
  2. Education
    1. In reverse chronological order, most current/recent first.
    2. Don’t bother with GPA at this point (I’m 22 years into my professional career). What matters is that I earned degrees from accredited colleges.
    3. Be sure to include thesis and dissertation title, but not abstract.
  3. Publications: Group these in several categories, depending on what’s applicable. I’ll probably go with something like this:
    1. Peer Reviewed
      1. Published
      2. Accepted and Forthcoming
      3. Proposed
    2. Online
      1. Solicited or Responses to Calls
      2. Unsolicited
      3. Guest Posts
    3. Popular
  4. Presentations
    1. Conference
    2. Invited
    3. Informal (not sure what this is going to mean…)
  5. Teaching Experience
    1. Higher Education: Term-by-term summary statement of each class outcome and professional development undertaken as a result, if applicable. [Note: here’s where I wonder if it’s useful to specify anything about student evaluations, because mine are regularly quite strong.]
    2. Secondary: Quick listing of classes
    3. Noncredit or Others: Include guest lectures, church teaching experiences, other non-traditional instructional opportunities. <– This is probably a way to demonstrate a career-long dedication to pedagogy, perhaps a differentiator when applying to a school with strong instructional requirements.
  6. Service: I think I’ll present this as pedagogical and community. As a composition teacher, my work is often in service to all other disciplines; as a professional and as a person, I give back to my professional, personal, and religious communities and want it known that I do so.
    1. Pedagogical (Just a mention that I teach composition)
    2. Professional
    3. Personal
  7. Grants: I have little to show here, but I don’t see much benefit of grouping these with granularity.
  8. Professional: This is an area unique to my experience: I have LOADS of professional experience in higher education and nonprofits that is not “academic” or “scholarly.” As a result, I want to be able to highlight my work history in several categories.
    1. Web Development
    2. IT Management
    3. Educational Leadership
  9. Professional Development
    1. Webinars
    2. Conferences
    3. Classes
  10. Honors and Awards
    1. Offices held/Appointments received
    2. Awards and honors received (I think I’ll go back to undergraduate, but probably don’t need to. Only if appropriate to Comp/Rhet experience.)
    3. Other ways of being honored (honorary degrees, employee of the month, etc.)
  11. Interests: A way to reach beyond the scholarly and point to areas of intersection between personal, professional, community, and service. In my case, my interests are in technologies, especially new technologies.
  12. References

Outlines: CC-licensed Flickr image courtesy mkorsakov

Outlining a CV in Composition & Rhetoric

Composition and rhetoric is a little bit of an intimidating field to write one’s CV into, because we study and have expertise on the rhetoricity of things. Applying those same guidelines and standards to my own work can be intimidating. Nevertheless, here’s a beginning outline.

  1. Personal Information
    1. Include meaningful contact information: where I live is useful, but email and mobile phone are probably most meaningful.
    2. Include social media links (but be sure those included and those not included are up to snuff and entirely presentable). The identity we allow others to see who are not our friends is as important to readers of the CV as the identity we create for those who follow or like our social media presences.
    3. Include professional-oriented social media like LinkedIn and Academia.edu. One’s openness and willingness to be identified on social media is part of the rhetorical identity portrayed through the CV.
  2. Education
    1. In reverse chronological order, most current/recent first.
    2. Don’t bother with GPA at this point (I’m 22 years into my professional career). What matters is that I earned degrees from accredited colleges.
    3. Be sure to include thesis and dissertation title, but not abstract.
  3. Publications: Group these in several categories, depending on what’s applicable. I’ll probably go with something like this:
    1. Peer Reviewed
      1. Published
      2. Accepted and Forthcoming
      3. Proposed
    2. Online
      1. Solicited or Responses to Calls
      2. Unsolicited
      3. Guest Posts
    3. Popular
  4. Presentations
    1. Conference
    2. Invited
    3. Informal (not sure what this is going to mean…)
  5. Teaching Experience
    1. Higher Education: Term-by-term summary statement of each class outcome and professional development undertaken as a result, if applicable. [Note: here’s where I wonder if it’s useful to specify anything about student evaluations, because mine are regularly quite strong.]
    2. Secondary: Quick listing of classes
    3. Noncredit or Others: Include guest lectures, church teaching experiences, other non-traditional instructional opportunities. <– This is probably a way to demonstrate a career-long dedication to pedagogy, perhaps a differentiator when applying to a school with strong instructional requirements.
  6. Service: I think I’ll present this as pedagogical and community. As a composition teacher, my work is often in service to all other disciplines; as a professional and as a person, I give back to my professional, personal, and religious communities and want it known that I do so.
    1. Pedagogical (Just a mention that I teach composition)
    2. Professional
    3. Personal
  7. Grants: I have little to show here, but I don’t see much benefit of grouping these with granularity.
  8. Professional: This is an area unique to my experience: I have LOADS of professional experience in higher education and nonprofits that is not “academic” or “scholarly.” As a result, I want to be able to highlight my work history in several categories.
    1. Web Development
    2. IT Management
    3. Educational Leadership
  9. Professional Development
    1. Webinars
    2. Conferences
    3. Classes
  10. Honors and Awards
    1. Offices held/Appointments received
    2. Awards and honors received (I think I’ll go back to undergraduate, but probably don’t need to. Only if appropriate to Comp/Rhet experience.)
    3. Other ways of being honored (honorary degrees, employee of the month, etc.)
  11. Interests: A way to reach beyond the scholarly and point to areas of intersection between personal, professional, community, and service. In my case, my interests are in technologies, especially new technologies.
  12. References

Outlines: CC-licensed Flickr image courtesy mkorsakov

Learning about CVs

As I sought CVs, I started seeking those for luminaries who I respect a great deal, like Paul Prior and Charles Bazerman. But I quickly discovered that luminaries like these teach at similar kinds of schools, and the requirement to include three Carnegie classifications among the four CVs required that I find more than luminaries. As a result, Academia.edu became my friend. Turns out, if you’re not considered a luminary, your CV won’t appear top of list in Google search or even in a search on an institutional webpage. So I ended up finding Anthony Lee, chair of the UMUC English department, through Academia.edu rather than a Google search or a search on the UMUC website.

What surprised me were the different CV types. Prior and Bazerman maintain web-based CVs, Bazerman’s on the UCSB website and Prior’s on his own website. Both designs appear dated, but the contents are at least as up-to-date as 2013. James A. Herrick at Hope College maintains a more traditional PDF version of his CV on the Hope College website, while Lee maintains a traditional (print-based) CV in a Word document on his Academia.edu site.

I’ve chosen to host my CV on Google Docs, which poses its own set of challenges. First, it’s a hybrid platform: entirely online with print capabilities, based on a print design and visual metaphor (i.e. the traditional “page” appears on a WYSIWYG platform). This flexibility is useful, giving me the ability to post to a website or submit as a print-ready document; but it also reflects a certain expectation of users that they will be familiar with Google Drive and able to access the file. Second, it’s not something that’s easily embedded on a platform like WordPress or Academia.edu. While it’s quite easy to link to the document, it’s much more difficult to embed a print-ready version in a webpage like WordPress or Academia.edu can do. Lee’s .doc CV is quite legible embedded on the Academia.edu page.

As I continue scholarship and professional development, it’s clear that I need to provide more granular detail to publication and presentation sections. I don’t have many published print pieces, but I can talk about chapters in progress, presentations accepted, chapters accepted for publication, and the like. Using subheadings and chunking in my CV design, I can make it more readable and much easier to quickly glean the important details about me: I’m educated, I’m publishing and interested in publishing, and I have loads of professional communications and teaching experience at all levels that represent my dedication to secondary and post-secondary pedagogy. These are abilities I need to highlight more clearly and directly in my CV redesign.

Curriculum Vitae: CC-licensed Flickr image courtesy Desi Italy